The Tuesday Night Bloggers: Book scouting Rex Stout

12435871_10206617807136697_1571551562_nA group of related bloggers who work in the general area of Golden Age Mysteries has decided to collaborate and publish a blog post every Tuesday as the Tuesday Night Bloggers. We began in the spirit of celebrating Agatha Christie’s 125th birthday anniversary. We’ve now going to continue with a different Golden Age mystery writer every month; Tuesdays in January will be devoted to Rex Stout.

Book scouting Rex Stout

Rex Stout is one of my favourite all-time mystery writers … I discovered him in my teens and quickly read pretty much everything he ever wrote (it took me a few years to track down the more esoteric items).  He published books from 1913 until just before his death in 1975; you can imagine that his books were designed with almost every imaginable cover style over the years.  He was published by a number of different publishers before he settled down to his long association with Viking Press in hardcover and Bantam in paperback.Over the coming weeks I hope to bring you some blog pieces on some of his lesser-known work, specifically things that are not part of the Nero Wolfe canon (or, as it’s known punningly to Wolfe fans, the corpus, since Nero Wolfe has a large body and Rex Stout has a large body of work).  There’s been an awful lot written over the years about Nero Wolfe, including a couple of full-length studies, and somewhat less attention has been paid to his non-mystery work and his other detectives.  I hope to do a little bit to rectify that.

Stout_Door_to_death_Dell_10-cent-1But first, since I’ve been told you all like my display of lovely paperback covers, I thought I’d give you an idea of some of the things that an experienced book scout would be looking to find.  Of course, the really valuable editions are hardcover first editions, especially the earliest titles with gorgeous illustrations of orchids on the cover.  But over the years Stout was published in a number of unusual paperback editions for which you could be keeping your eyes open as you rummage through old bookstores.

Of particular note here: I’ve added a couple of quite rare items that you may never find, including the scarce-as-hen’s-teeth limited edition of Corsage and the Dell Ten Cent edition of Door to Death (a standalone publication of one of the three stories in Three Doors to Death).  I thought you also might like to see a few examples of a magazine-sized format that was published under the Rex Stout name; he had little to do with it, but you can make a nice chunk of change if you find a copy.

4755239475_6065d1f68a_mThere are Dell mapbacks, early Pocket editions, plenty of early Avon (including one of the “picture frame” series), a Lion Library, a Mercury Mystery, and quite a few Bantams.  And I’ve included one “ringer” to amuse you; it’s a British hardcover edition with a new title.  See if you can spot it and full marks if you know the American title to which it refers.  Hint: It refers to the same game in both places, just with a different name and different rules.

Notice how fashions in illustration change?  Back in the 40s and 50s, it was apparently necessary to show an illustration of Wolfe himself on the cover … when Bantam took over, they reduced him to a silhouette, a disembodied head, and then finally banished him entirely.  And although the jackets of the early first editions relied heavily on illustrations involving orchids, you will hardly see them at all on the paperbacks — even the one that mentions orchids in the title.

d7ba1a34451475b5e6a53095d1bee5f3 227 Rex Stout The Silent Speaker Bantam048 14671062636_c51870842a 28 Rex Stout 3 Doors to Death Dell052 367-1 940909925e3ae08d1dadee4b2184c696 BookIfDeathEverSlept 4008622dbe7a51d5ee72413a19bed4d1 24 Rex Stout Prisoner's Base Bantam 1963 1 Double for Death - cov imagesrex_stout_quarterly_1945spr_v1_n1 RexStout8 md17229262059 18464e5ddecce945fa35d40b025c9cdb rex_stout_quarterly_1945fll_v1_n2

images-1 16 Rex Stout~DOUBLE FOR DEATH~1943 Vintage DELL MAPBACK 135 Rex Stout Not Quite Dead Enough Dell 1 6401932407_16d0bf4dec 2a1d47cbc17b663ac6ab4926ee3a85bb 127666 Stout-FDL-2 d96d6846219755b22cb75391153a624e 387-1 a1838bfe8e3a5ac6dd1fc30d341227ca

 

 

 

 

 

7 thoughts on “The Tuesday Night Bloggers: Book scouting Rex Stout

  1. tracybham says:

    Noah, great post and lots of lovely covers. This morning, I have published a post on Too Many Cooks for the Tuesday Night Bloggers…

    Lots of covers here that I have never seen. I will have to use this as my buying guide when I start looking. I do have the Dell Ten Cent edition of Door to Death, and the Dell 3 Doors to Death that you show. And a few others that you pictured.

  2. What great covers, very atmospheric, summoning up an image of a lost era in the USA….

  3. […] Noah Stewart, Noah’s Archives: Book scouting Rex Stout […]

  4. Bob Byrne says:

    Howdy. I’m a huge Wolfe fan and I plan on doing more posts about him as part of my ‘The Public Life of Sherlock Holmes’ column over at BlackGate.com. Looking forward to your upcoming Stout posts.

    https://www.blackgate.com/2014/06/23/the-public-life-of-sherlock-holmes-meet-nero-wolfe/

    • Noah Stewart says:

      If you publish something on a Tuesday this month about Nero Wolfe, we would be delighted to add you to our roster… just lift the “Too Many Bloggers” artwork and add it to your post, and let me know where the post is. Great to meet another Nero Wolfe fan!

  5. lesblatt says:

    Noah, that’s a fine collection of covers. Some are good representations of the stories inside – but I absolutely love the one for “Too Many Cooks,” in which every picture element has virtually nothing to do with the book. But if it sells…

    You also persuaded me to go look and see what Corsage is getting these days. Looks like my copy ought to be under lock and key. Sigh…

    As I think you know, Stout is among my favorite authors. Delighted to see him getting the attention from this group.

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